Travelling with Pets

shutterstock_60479023Pet Customs

Recently I’ve been doing a lot of research on the rules around bringing pets in and out of the UK, and I thought that I better share my findings with you.
For anyone who is interesting in travelling with their cat, dog or ferret (seriously), then please read on.

* 2014 Update: My mum is moving to Warsaw, Poland from Brisbane, and she has made all travel arrangements for my cat Roxy with JetPets. So far, they have been amazing. Very supportive, understanding and helpful, so I do recommend them as a great pet carrier to get your pet from Australia to Europe. They ensure the pets have lots of room, are fed their preferred food, are well looked after and they even get ‘cuddle time’ during the minimum 8 hour layover (which is a legal requirement). Plus, if they can manage to move a tiger from Poland to Australia, then I fully trust them to move my mini tiger Roxy in the opposite direction 🙂

Pet travel rules changed on 1 January 2012 when the UK brought its procedures in line with the European Union, so I strongly encourage that before you make any further arrangements, contact the Pet Travel Scheme helpline on 0870 241 1710 to ensure that there haven’t been any further changes to the law.

The below information was obtained from www.defra.gov.uk on 30th May 2012.

From Jan 2012, all pets can enter or re-enter the UK from any country in the world without quarantine provided they meet the rules of the scheme, which will be different depending on the country or territory the pet is coming from.

What you need to do if you are entering the UK from the EU countries and listed non-EU countries:

1)     Have you pet microchipped.

2)     Have your pet vaccinated.

3)     Get pet travel documentation.

4)     Tapework treatment (dogs only)

5)     Arrange for your animal to travel with an approved transport company on an authorised route.

If you are entering the UK from an unlisted non-EU country, you will need to do all of the above 5 steps, plus:
6)     Arrange a blood test

You are responsible for ensuring your pet meets all the rules for entering the UK under the Pet Travel Scheme. Make sure you have had the procedures carried out in the correct order and your pet’s documentation is correctly completed. If you do not, your pet may not be able to enter the country or may have to be licensed into quarantine on arrival. This will mean delay and will cost you money.

Dangerous dogs in Great Britain

In Great Britain, it is illegal to possess certain types of dogs. If you bring one of these dogs into Great Britain, you could be prosecuted and the dog seized and ‘destroyed’ (I hate when they use that word!).
Section 1 of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 prohibits four types of dog:

  • Pit Bull Terrier
  • Japanese Tosa
  • Dogo Argentino
  • Fila Brasileiro

Visit this site for more information: http://www.defra.gov.uk/wildlife-pets/pets/dangerous/

Other Animals

Currently there are no rabies or tapeworm import requirements for other species of pet animals (rodents, rabbits, birds, ornamental fish, invertebrates, amphibians and reptiles) transported to the UK from EU Member States and other European countries (Andorra, Switzerland, Croatia, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Monaco, Norway, San Marino, Vatican City State). These species of pet animals may move freely to the UK.

Pet rabbits and rodents

Pet rabbits and rodents  imported into the UK from any non-EU country, other than those listed above,  must be licensed into quarantine for 4 months under the Rabies (Importation of Dogs, Cats and Other Mammals) Order 1974. However quarantine will not be required if the animal is a rodent or lagomorph which is licensed into a zoo or research premises for scientific research.

Pet Birds

For more information on importing live birds, hatching eggs and SPF eggs, please visit the official website.

Quarantine

As previously mentioned, from 1 January 2012 entry conditions for pets change as the UK brings its rules into line with the European Union. As part of these changes pets from unlisted thirds countries are no longer required to enter quarantine provided they meet certain pre-entry requirements (Refer to information above). Quarantine arrangements will remain in place to deal with animals that do not meet the new entry requirements.

If your pet does not meet the new entry requirements you will need to choose a suitable quarantine premise. For more information please visit the relevant website.

Taking your pet abroad

The rules above are consistent with the rules for all EU countries. Once your pet has received the vaccinations, be sure to keep all documents and don’t forget to get any necessary boosters, and you and your pet won’t have any problems travelling in and out of the UK.

If you want to travel outside of the EU, you must check with that particular country and see what the quarantine rules are.

Returning to Australia/NZ

For pets travelling to Australia or New Zealand from the UK, your pet will be required to stay in quarantine on arrival for at least one month 2 weeks during which you will not be able to visit or have any contact with your pet.
NB: New quarantine laws came into play in November 2013, where the minimum quarantine time from the UK was reduced from 1 month to two weeks.

Quarantine times can vary from country to country, so for more information on Australian animal customs, please visit: http://www.daff.gov.au/biosecurity/cat-dogs

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14 Responses

  1. Alexandra says:

    Hello!

    Thanks for the post – very useful! I live in the EU and am thinking of moving to London with my basenji puppy, but the one thing that concerns me most is not how to get my dog to London, but where to say with it – as you say, most people start out in co-ops and it hard to get a place without prior income in the UK so my question is – how strict are most landlords about pets and should I call each one that hasn’t specifically said “no pets”? Where is a good starting place to stay with a dog when apartment hunting – any tips?

    It kinda feels moving with my dog increases the costs quite drastically, but Im eager to find the best solution!

    Cheers, Alexandra

    • Hey Alexandra,

      Glad you found the post useful!
      There are so many dogs in London and so many renters, that I’m sure that loads of dog-owners (if not the majority of them) don’t have full landlord consent.
      It’s actually really hard to get permission to have a dog in the house. If you’re puppy is well-behaved and not a barker, then you may be ok.
      To be honest, if the rental contract doesn’t have a pet clause, I would just not bring it up at all and move your dog in.
      I unfortunately have a pet clause in mine saying I can’t have any animals, and I asked if we could get a dog recently and he said no, but he will reconsider in ‘due course’. That was about 5 months ago and we haven’t heard anything since. My next flat I will probably just get one anyway as I’m dying for a dog of my own 🙂

      Anyway, it’s completely up to you and how much risk you can take really. Worst case scenario is that you can probably lose your deposit. If you can find a share house where people don’t mind a dog then you will be fine! London people are pet-deprived so this may be easier than you think.

      K x

  2. Alexandra says:

    Hello!

    Thanks for the post – very useful! I live in the EU and am thinking of moving to London with my basenji puppy, but the one thing that concerns me most is not how to get my dog to London, but where to say with it – as you say, most people start out in co-ops and it hard to get a place without prior income in the UK so my question is – how strict are most landlords about pets and should I call each one that hasn’t specifically said “no pets”? Where is a good starting place to stay with a dog when apartment hunting – any tips?

    It kinda feels moving with my dog increases the costs quite drastically, but Im eager to find the best solution!

    Cheers, Alexandra

    • Hey Alexandra,

      Glad you found the post useful!
      There are so many dogs in London and so many renters, that I’m sure that loads of dog-owners (if not the majority of them) don’t have full landlord consent.
      It’s actually really hard to get permission to have a dog in the house. If you’re puppy is well-behaved and not a barker, then you may be ok.
      To be honest, if the rental contract doesn’t have a pet clause, I would just not bring it up at all and move your dog in.
      I unfortunately have a pet clause in mine saying I can’t have any animals, and I asked if we could get a dog recently and he said no, but he will reconsider in ‘due course’. That was about 5 months ago and we haven’t heard anything since. My next flat I will probably just get one anyway as I’m dying for a dog of my own 🙂

      Anyway, it’s completely up to you and how much risk you can take really. Worst case scenario is that you can probably lose your deposit. If you can find a share house where people don’t mind a dog then you will be fine! London people are pet-deprived so this may be easier than you think.

      K x

  3. chantelle says:

    Hiya!

    Great post. Just curious on how much your mother is paying for JetPets? I intend to move to London and take my dog with me and rather curious on the costs involved!

    Chantelle

    • Hey Chantelle,
      Mum paid around $2000-2500, it was more than her ticket! In saying that, they did such an amazing job. Organised everything, were there for emotional support, even ensured that Roxy got ‘cuddle & play time’ in between flights. My cat is 13 y.o and when she arrived she was completely normal, happy and settled in straight away, which was amazing!
      I’m getting a dog this year too and if I go back to Aus I will def use them. Oh, and London is amazing for dogs too, you can take them everywhere 🙂
      x

      • chantelle says:

        Hey,

        I only just saw that you replied to my post now! How delayed! I would have thought I get a notification that you replied. Nevermind! Oh wow, $2500 is quite a bit, but do you know if that depends on height and weight? Or breed even! I suppose it is all worth it, especially if they get cuddle and play time 😀 Thanks for the reply! xo

  4. chantelle says:

    Hiya!

    Great post. Just curious on how much your mother is paying for JetPets? I intend to move to London and take my dog with me and rather curious on the costs involved!

    Chantelle

    • Hey Chantelle,
      Mum paid around $2000-2500, it was more than her ticket! In saying that, they did such an amazing job. Organised everything, were there for emotional support, even ensured that Roxy got ‘cuddle & play time’ in between flights. My cat is 13 y.o and when she arrived she was completely normal, happy and settled in straight away, which was amazing!
      I’m getting a dog this year too and if I go back to Aus I will def use them. Oh, and London is amazing for dogs too, you can take them everywhere 🙂
      x

      • chantelle says:

        Hey,

        I only just saw that you replied to my post now! How delayed! I would have thought I get a notification that you replied. Nevermind! Oh wow, $2500 is quite a bit, but do you know if that depends on height and weight? Or breed even! I suppose it is all worth it, especially if they get cuddle and play time 😀 Thanks for the reply! xo

  5. Iwona says:

    What about the cats??

  6. Iwona says:

    What about the cats??

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